Turkish Riot, Humor & Business Development

Turkish Riot, Humor & Business Development

Turkish Riot is an online video game in which the goal is to send as many tweets as possible before the police beat you up. It was created last summer, presumably as a lark, to mock the role of police violence in the Gezi political protests in Turkey. I’m not usually a fan of video games, but as someone living in the middle of Istanbul at the time, I thought it was hysterically funny. I’ve never made it past 17 tweets. Maybe you will do better. You can try it here:

Tear gas, water cannons, rubber bullets and political intimidation take their toll on everyone, but the Gezi protesters did an amazing job of using humor to stay energized and motivated.

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2013 Political Protests in Turkey: My Version

The summer of 2013 was marked by mass political protests across Turkey.  The main protests lasted about a month with some continuing in various forms for another two or three months.  The Turkish mainstream media was not covering the protest and U.S. news sources were covering it only minimally.  Therefore, I like many others, attempted to keep my U.S. community aware of what was happening through Facebook posts.  Since I decided to post on this site about how living through the protests turned me into a Twitter convert, I decided to also share my Facebook posts from that time period here, for any who might be interested.

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Tips for Lawyers Moving Abroad: Lessons from Three Years in Istanbul

Tips for Lawyers Moving Abroad: Lessons from Three Years in Istanbul

As lawyers, many people may think that their only options for living abroad would be to work for a big international firm or an NGO.  But actually it’s not that hard to find or create a job for yourself overseas.  I moved to Istanbul in 2010 because my Dad had died and I was depressed and wanted a change.  Although technically I am a lawyer, I haven’t practiced in many years and went to Istanbul intending to create a coaching practice, not a law practice.  These tips are based on my experience as well as that of other lawyers who I met living abroad.

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Turkish Weddings

Recently, I was walking by a wedding “center” with a friend and we saw big crowds of people outside.  She suggested that we go in, watch a wedding and see if we can get some candy.  This seemed odd to me, but I’m generally up for anything, so in we went.  It turns out that this is the Turkish equivalent to getting married at a courthouse, except that couple brings along three or four hundred friends and family, and the whole thing is even less romantic.  A loudspeaker announced the couples’ names and told everyone to file into the auditorium.  It also said that once you have “celebrated” with the couple that you should leave as soon as possible to make room for others.

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